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England - 1489 AD Groat - (EF) Hammered, Silver

Stock code: CM000284X
£1,225
Country: England
King (reign): Henry VII (1485 - 1509)
Denomination/metal: Silver Groat
Date/mint mark: cinquefoil/none, London
Type: Hammered Facing bust issue
Ref. no: N 1704; S 2195; Potter type 6.; Stewartby p435

Obv. Crowned (double arched), facing bust within tressure , quatrefoils by, 'HENRIC DI GRA REX ANGL Z FRANC, Henry by the Grace of God king of England and France.. Rev. Long cross over two circular legends , 'POSVI DEVM ADIVTORE MEVM', I have made God my helper and 'CIVITAS LONDON, City of London, groups of 3 pellets in each angle.
26mm, 3g. EF - Extremely Fine, well struck, well centred, beautiful patina

Superb coin – portrait and all details very clear, no wear and beautiful bluish lustre to toning. Must rank as one of the finest known. Henry VII was King of England and Lord of Ireland and was the first monarch of the House of Tudor. Henry won the throne when he defeated Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of England to win his throne on the field of battle. He was successful in restoring the power and stability of the English monarchy after the political upheavals of the Wars of the Roses He founded a long-lasting dynasty and was peacefully succeeded by his son,Henry VIII after a reign of nearly 24 years.
Although Henry can be credited with the restoration of political stability in England, and a number of commendable administrative, economic and diplomatic initiatives, the latter part of his reign was characterised by a financial rapacity which stretched the bounds of legality.

Snc 1992; ex H Mossop Glendining Nov. 1991

England - Charles I, Gold Triple Unite, minted Oxford during the Civil War, 1642

Stock code: CM000481X
£98,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Pounds, Three (Triple Unite)
Date/mint mark: 1642
Type Oxford Mint, 'Declaration'
Ref. no: Schneider 286; N 2381; S 2724

Obv. Half length tall figure of Charles to left, wearing crown and full armour holding a sword and an olive branch. Plumes behind, 'CAROLVS DG MAG BRIT FRAN ET HI REX'. Rev. Declaration in a three line scroll, 'RELIG PROT / LEG ANG / LIBER PAR' (Protestant Religion, Laws of England, Liberty of Parliament), three plumes above with mark of value, date below; around 'EXVRGAT DEVS DISSIPENTVR INIMICI' (Let God arise and let the enemy be scattered).
46mm, 27g. GVF - Good Very Fine, strongly struck

TheTripleUnite, valued atsixty shillings, 60/-or three pounds, was the highestEnglishdenomination to be produced. It was struck at the Oxford Mint set up during the first English Civil War of 1642-6 and issued between January and March of 1642 at the hurriedly set up mint at New Inn Hall in Oxford. This huge coin was issued, at least in part, for use as gifts to those whom the King wished to 'cement' to his side in the Civil War. Thus he obverse design for the coin features an armoured bust of Charles I, with broadsword raised, and yet in visual dichotomy he bears an olive branch clutched over his heart. Charles was visually appealing to either nature of the benefactor he was seeking to entice. The bust on this coin is very hawkish which is the earliest type, later he had it changed to a more benevolent softer style. On the reverse he put his famous declaration – uttered in 1642 when he swore to to uphold the Protestant Religion, the laws of England and the freedom of Parliament. Very rare and spectacular coin!

England - 1641 AD Shillings, Twenty (Unite) - (EF) Hammered, Gold

Stock code: CM000318XX
£4,550
Country: England
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Shillings, Twenty (Unite)
Date/mint mark: Tower
Type: Hammered Group 'F', Class II, Bust '7'.
Ref. no: Cf Schneider 164; Brooker 111/110; N 2154; S2694

Obv. Crowned, draped bust left, large lace collar, value XX' 'behind, CAROLVS D G MAG BRI FRA ET HIB REX Rev. Crowned, garnished oval Royal Arms dividing crowned 'C' and crowned 'R', FLORENT CONCORDIA REGNA', Through concord kingdoms flourish.
33mm, 9.04g. EF - Good Very Fine, strongly struck. Pleasing portrait, small scuffs in obv. field

Very pretty coin issued just before Cromwell took London and therefore controlled the Mint – rare mintmark and therefore date.
When the Civil War began in 1642, the Tower mint fell into the hands of Parliament and Charles was forced to open a mints in Royalist held western England at Shrewsbury and Oxford (1642 – 46). Parliament still issued coins in the name of the king but in this initial period of confusion as the king left, not so much coin was issued..

Stock code: CM000026X
£650
Country: Great Britain
Type: Struck
Ref. no: MI II 437/39; E479

Obv. Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of George right. Rev. King indicating Morea on a library terestrial globe.
45mm, 43.84g. EF - Extremely Fine,, even patination with dull bronze lustre

Treaty of Passarowitz 1718. Copper medallion by J. Croker. Turkey had wrested Morea (now in Greece) from the Venetians. Emperor Charles VI as guarantor of the Treaty of Carlowitz had come to Venice's aid and defeated Turks at Belgrade. George I was appointed mediator and a Peace was concluded at Passarowitz (which allowed Turkey to retain Morea!)
RARE MEDAL, VERY GOOD CONDITION AND WITH GREEK AND TURKISH INTEREST.

Bank of England, ONE MILLION POUND banknote 1948 - One of only two 'million pound' notes in existence!

Stock code: B000001X
£125,000
Country: Great Britain
King (reign): George VI - (1936 - 1952)
Denomination/metal: Banknote Pounds, One Million
Date/mint mark: Bank of England

0mm, 0g. VF - Small hole cancellation through signature. Light creases and some handling otherwise good very fine to about extremely fine and extremely rare.

One Million Pounds, 30 August 1948, D 000007, on Bank of England watermarked paper, PAYABLE ON DEMAND, signature of E.E. Bridges, Secretary to the Treasury, bottom right, stamped ‘CANCELLED, 6 OCT. 1948, BANK OF ENGLAND’. Monies received through the Marshall Aid plan after World War II, were subject to strict accountability. The Treasury had to borrow from the Bank of England on a short term basis and to help with the book keeping requested the printing of high value notes. The total order sent to The Bank of England printing works was for Three Hundred Million Pounds in varying denominations, starting from Twenty Five Thousand Pounds. It is believed that the entire issue was subsequently destroyed with the exception of numbers Seven and Eight for One Million Pounds which were presented to the British and American Treasury Secretaries respectively.

England, Edward I. Silver Groat 1279 - c1281. 'One of the finest known'.

Stock code: CM001125
£23,500
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Cross potent',
Type New Coinage, Variery 'F'.
Ref. no: SCBI 39 var G; Allen F6/R37; Fox 2; n 1006; S 1379h

Obv. Crowned bust in quatrefoil of two lines, rosets in angles, triple pellet stops, 'EDWARDVS : DI : GRA : REX : ANGL'. Rev. Long Cross, triple pellets in angles, inner and outer legend, 'DNS HIBN'E DVX AQVT', (Lord of Ireland, duke of Aquitaine'), 'CIVI LONDONIA' (city of London).
29mm, 5.45g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck and attractively patinated.

Outstanding piece, Iconic coin and one of the finest known – certainly the best on the market in the last ten years. In 1279 Edward introduced this large silver fourpence for the first time in England as part of his 'New Coinage'. For some reason it was not a success and it's minting appears to have been abandoned only a few years later in around 1281. Two specimens were found in the Dover Hoard put down in 1295 and from then on there is no hoard evidence which suggests that they did not even circulate by the end of the 1290s. The majority exist today from single finds – but most of these are gilded and/or have soldered mounts on the back which suggests that their primary use, ultimately seems to have been jewellery! Consequently, as well as being extremely rare they normally are found mounted which makes the perfect example even more difficult to find! This is not only a very rare coin but an outstanding example of the first groat issued in England, a denomination which would only be resumed by Edward's grandson some sixty years later in 1351!

Victoria, Proof Specimen Sovereign, 1887 S

Stock code: CM001737
£25,000
Country: Australia
King (reign): Victoria (1837 - 1901)
Denomination/metal: Gold Sovereign
Date/mint mark: 1887 S
Type Proof Specimen Sovereign (1887)

Obv. Jubilee tall veiled and crowned bust left with older features, top cross of crown touches linear circle, wearing 13 pearl necklace, initials J.E.B. fully on truncation in a straight line but curving up towards shoulder, hooked J doubled, first type legend with G: further from crown, finely toothed border within twin linear concentric circles and raised prominent rim both sides Rev. Declaration inscription on continuous scroll in three lines, RELIG. PROT: / LEG:. ANG: / LIBER PAR. date in field below, three Oxford plumes above, linear circle around, pellet stops in legend that runs into scroll Declaration, no initial mark, .EXVRGAT. DEVS. DISSIPENTVR. INIMICI. 9.05g (Beresford-Jones dies XI/19; Brooker 855; Schneider II-327; N.2389; S.2738).
7.97g. - Two tiny rim nicks on reverse, very light scratch in hair perhaps from some light polishing, more yellow to orange colour than a currency piece, well defined and otherwise very pleasing, good extremely fine and extremely rare.

Victoria, Proof Specimen Sovereign, 1887 S, Jubilee tall veiled and crowned bust left with older features, top cross of crown touches linear circle, wearing 13 pearl necklace, initials J.E.B. fully on truncation in a straight line but curving up towards shoulder, hooked J doubled, first type legend with G: further from crown, finely toothed border within twin linear concentric circles and raised prominent rim both sides, rev struck en medaille, St George slaying dragon with sword, streamer to helmet, horse with short tail, three strand end to tail, two extra spurs of hair on upper curve of tail, dragon with three claws to upper and four to lower arm, the second lower claw detached, S mint mark at centre of ground, date in exergue, tiny B.P. to upper right, edge milled, weight 7.97g (McD.174; QM.-; Marsh -; KM.10; Fr.19; cf.S.3868A). Two tiny rim nicks on reverse, very light scratch in hair perhaps from some light polishing, more yellow to orange colour than a currency piece, well defined and otherwise very pleasing, good extremely fine and extremely rare.

England, James I gold Unite issued 1613- 1615.

Stock code: CM001755
£3,000
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James I, 1603 – 1625
Denomination/metal: Gold Unite
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Cinquefoil' 1613-15.
Type Second Coinage, Fourth Bust.
Ref. no: N 2084; S 2619.

Obv. Crowned, armoured bust of James right, holding orb and sceptre, 'IACOBVS D'G' MA' BRI' FRA' ET HI' REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms dividing 'IR',, FACIAM EOS IN GENTEM VNAM', (I will make them into one nation).
37mm, 0.997g. AVF - About Very Fine, but with a particularly well struck portrait.

Attractive coin and splendid contemporary portrait of this first Stuart king – although the piece has seen some wear, due to a strong strike all the details are clear, particularly the king's facial features and armour. Also, this mintmark for 1613-15 turns up much less commonly than the earlier issues of the series. Called a 'Unite' because of James's wish to 'unite' the nations of England and Scotland that is broadcast by the reverse legend. A concept that is particularly relevant today !

England, Edward VI silver Crown 1552.

Stock code: CM001754
£3,300
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Edward VI (1547 - 1553)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Tun', dated 1552
Type Third Period, Fine Issue
Ref. no: Lingford dies A-13; N 1933; S 2478.

Obv. Edward, crowned and in full armour holding sword in right hand, riding war horse right which is heavily caparisoned, date below, 'EDWARD VI D' G' AGL' FRANCI' Z HIB' REX'. Rev. Royal Arms on cross fourchee, 'POSVI DEVM ADIVTORE' MEVM', (I have made god my helper).
41mm, 3.093g. AVF - About Very Fine, attractively and evenly patinated

Very good example of this coin – the details in the horse's caparisons and Edward's armour are very clear. Not only is this a very attractive coin of Henry VIII's young sickly son as king (portrayed here as a fourteen year old) - but it is also the rarer second date. Edward was England's first monarch who was raised as a Protestant came to the throne at the age of ten. Edward's reign was marked by economic problems and social unrest that, in 1549, erupted into riot and rebellion. An expensive war with Scotland, at first successful, ended with military withdrawal and Boulogne-sur-Mer in exchange for peace. The transformation of the Anglican Church into a recognisably Protestant body also occurred under Edward, who took great interest in religious matters. It was during Edward's reign that Protestantism was established for the first time in England.

England, Æthelberht silver penny minted by Hundred at Canterbury 858 – 864.

Stock code: CM001753
£2,850
Country: England, Medieval
King (reign): Æthelberht, 858 – 865/6
Denomination/metal: Silver Penny
Date/mint mark: c. 858 – 864
Type Inscribed Cross type, Canterbury, moneyer : Hunred
Ref. no: Naismith 192; BMC 39; N 620; S 1053.

Obv. Bust right, '+AETHELBEARHT REX' (HT ligulate). Rev. Voided Long Cross, 'HVNR EDMO NETA'. (Coin of Hunred)
20mm, 1.05g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, attractively patinated.

Outstanding condition, attractively toned and excessively rare – however, this piece is light by slightly over 10% - being 1.06gm. rather than the correct 1.20gm. weight for this period. The coin is full size and not short of flan 'size-wise', and minute examination of the edge reveals no damage or loss, so the piece is not 'clipped'. It simply appears to be an underweight coin for which moneyers could receive a capital punishment for – and did ! Æthelberht, meaning "magnificent noble", was the King of Kent from 858 and of Wessex from 860 until his death in 865/6. He was the third son of Æthelwulf of Wessex and his first wife, Osburh. In 855 Æthelberht became under-king of Kent while his father, Æthelwulf, visited Rome. His brother Æthelbald was left in charge of the West Saxons. After his father's death in 858 he succeeded him as king of Kent and the other eastern parts of the kingdom. When Æthelbald died childless in 860, the kingship of the West Saxons also passed to Æthelberht. Like his father and brother he was also crowned at Kingston upon Thames. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle describes Æthelberht's reign as one of good harmony and lasting peace. During his reign the Danes returned and soon after his accession a Danish army landed either via the Thames or on the south coast and advanced as far as Winchester before two contingents of Æthelberht's Saxons defeated them. Towards the end of his reign a more organised force arrived under the command of Ragnar Lodbrok. His fleet had been attacking the east coast of England, particularly Northumbria, and in the winter of 864/5 they stayed in Thanet. Although the Saxons made a pact with them, the Danes plundered east Kent, before advancing back up the east coast.. One of the developments, as a result of this Viking threat, was that Wessex and its recent south-eastern conquests became a united kingdom. Unlike his predecessors, Æthelberht did not appoint another member of his family as under-king of Kent. A charter issued in the first year of Æthelberht's reign reflects an extraordinary new kind of assembly: it was the first charter of a West Saxon king to include a full complement both of West Saxon and of Kentish witnesses. Æthelberht died in 865/6 and was succeeded by his brother Æthelred. He was buried at Sherborne Abbey in Dorset beside his brother Æthelbald.

England, Henry VIII gold Half-Angel issued 1509 – 1526.

Stock code: CM001720
£1,750
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Henry VIII (1509 - 1547)
Denomination/metal: Gold Angel, Half
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Portcullis with chains' – 1509-26
Type First Coinage
Ref. no: Schneider 564; N 1761; S 2266.

Obv. The angel St. Michael spearing fallen dragon like devil, 'HENRIC DI GRA REX AGL Z'. (numeral 'VIII' in legend omitted !) Rev. Ancient ship with central mast a cross upon which is the Royal Arms, 'h' and rose either side. 'O CRVX AVE SPES VNICA', (Hail O cross, our only hope).
21mm, 2.45g. AVF - About Very Fine, well struck

A little wear but strongly struck so that all the main features and letters in the legend are very visible and a scarce variation with the 'VIII' missed out in the obv. legend. Henry VIII was the second monarch of the House of Tudor, succeeding his father, Henry VII.
Besides his six marriages, Henry VIII is known for his role in the separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church. Henry's struggles with Rome led to the separation of the Church of England from papal authority, the Dissolution of Monasteries and establishing himself as the Supreme Head of the church of England Yet he remained a believer in core Catholic theological teachings, even after his excommunication from the Catholic Church. Henry oversaw the legal union of England and Wales with the Laws in Wales Acts 1535 - 42 . He ruled with absolute power and his desire to provide England with a male heir—which stemmed partly from personal vanity and partly because he believed a daughter, would be unable to consolidate the Tudor dynasty and the fragile peace that existed following the Wars of the Roses—led to the two things that Henry is remembered for: his six marriages, and the English reformation , which made England a mostly Protestant nation. In later life he became morbidly obese and his health suffered; his public image is frequently depicted as one of a lustful, egotistical, harsh, and insecure king.

Flemish, 'Continental Imitation' of an Edward IV gold Ryal, c. 1495.

Stock code: CM001857
£4,500
Country: Netherlands
King (reign): Edward IV (1471 - 1483)
Denomination/metal: Gold Ryal
Type Gorinchem, 'Continental Imitation' of an Edward IV gold Ryal, c. 1495.
Ref. no: Thompson Gp. II, Cl. 3; S 1952.

Obv. Crowned king in medieval ship holding sword and Royal Arms, flag with Gothic 'E' to right, No mm; EDWARD DI' GRA REX ANGL S FRA DNS' IB. (Edward by the Grace of God king of England and France, lord of Ireland). Rev. Cross 'fleur de lise' with crowned leopards in angles, rose on star in centre, all within tressure of eight arches, small lis in angles, 'crown mm; 'IHC' AVT TRANSIENS PER MEDIVM ILLORVM IBAT', (But Jesus, passing in the midst of them, went his way).
37mm, 7.64g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, well struck and almost as struck !

This 'Ryal' is a Flemish contemporary imitation of an English Edward IV Ryal issued shortly afterwards (late fifteenth century) by the mint of the city of Gorinchem in the Netherlands. This attribution is now fairly certain as there are die links between these copies and official Gorinchem issues. Such was the confidence and familiarity of English gold on the Continent – mainly due to the wool trade that produced such wealth on either side of the Channel, that 'English Gold' was also 'unofficially' struck in the Lowlands to purchase wool as English nobles became the preferred currency– and being of good gold and correct weight, circulated freely either side of the Channel. The main difference is that the flans are a little larger than their English name-sake and the die engraving is not quite so sharp. This piece is in outstanding condition being about 'as struck' !

England, Charles I silver crown 1642, Shrewsbury Mint during Civil War.

Stock code: CM001858
£6,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: 1642
Type Civil War issue, Shrewsbury Mint ? Horseman with groundline.
Ref. no: S 2926.

Obv. King, crowned and in armour, on horseback left, holding sword erect in right hand, sash flying out behind, plumes above this, CAROLVS : D.G : MAG : BRIT. FRAN. ET. HIBER. REX. Rev. Declaration 'RELIG PROT LEG ANG LIBER PAR' (Protestant Religion. Laws of England, Freedom of Parliament) between three plumes and denomination (V) above and date below, 'EXVRGAT DEVS DISSIPENTVR INIMICI' (Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered). Pellets mintmark.
44mm, 29.68g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, well struck with attractive even grey patina.

Superb condition coin of this rare provincial mint, exceptionally good detail in both horseman, legends and declaration. Handsome even grey toning and so rare to find in such good 'struck-up' condition – must rank as one of the best examples known for this Shropshire mint. These coins were hand struck in makeshift conditions in a mint hastily set up – quickly and carelessly to get coin out to pay the troops – only the weight was important. When the Civil War began in 1642, the Tower mint fell into the hands of Parliament and Charles was forced to open a mints in Royalist held western England at Oxford and Shrewsbury (1642 – 46) and further west. The week after raising his standard at Nottingham, Charles I proceeded into Shropshire, arriving in Wellington on 19 September 1642. On 20 September he issued the famous 'Wellington Declaration' (promising to uphold the Protestant Religion, the Laws of England and the Liberty of Parliament. This declaration in Latin is displayed on these western mint coins giving them the name of Declaration pieces) and inspected his troops below the Wrekin. From Wellington he marched to Shrewsbury, where he was joined by his two sons, the Prince of Wales and James, Prince Rupert, and great numbers of noblemen and gentlemen, and established a mint in the town (at which point this coin was struck). He remained there until 12 October, when he marched to Bridgnorth, and from there advanced to Edge Hill, in Warwickshire, where the first pitched battle of the First Civil War was fought.

England, James I gold Unite issued 1605 – 1606.

Stock code: CM001861
£4,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James I, 1603 – 1625
Denomination/metal: Gold Unite
Date/mint mark: mintmark 'Rose', 1605-06
Type Second Coinage, Second bust
Ref. no: S 2618.

Obv. Crowned, armoured bust of James right, holding orb and sceptre, 'IACOBVS D'G' MAG' BRIT' FRAN' ET HIB' REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms dividing 'IR',, FACIAM EOS IN GENTEM VNAM', (I will make them into one nation).
36mm, 9.84g. AEF - About Extemely Fine although weak area at middle of coin.

Particularly nice coin and splendid contemporary portrait of this first Stuart king – in almost unworn condition although there is a small area of weakness (due to thin metal) at he lower breast of James and the Scottish shield on the corresponding side on the rev. Called a 'Unite' because of James's wish to 'unite' the nations of England and Scotland that is broadcast by the reverse legend. A concept that is particularly relevant today !

England, Henry VI gold Noble. Struck Calais 1422 – 30.

Stock code: CM001856
£6,250
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Henry VI, 1422 – 1461
Denomination/metal: Gold Noble
Type Calais Mint, Annulet issue.
Ref. no: N 1415; S 1803.

Obv. King in antique ship holding shield of Royal Arms and sword, flag on stern, annulet by hand, 'hENRIC' DI GRA' REX ANGL' Z FRANC' DNS hYB'. Rev. Cross 'fleurdelise' with crowned leopards in angles, 'h' in centre, all within tressure of eight arches, lis in outer angles annulets in legend of rev., lis mm., 'Ih'C AVT' TRANSIEnS PER MEDIVM ILLORV' IBAT' (But Jesus, passing through the midst of them, went on his way).
35mm, 6.92g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, well struck with sharp definition.

Strongly struck with all details crisply clear making this example a very handsome coin and rare - plus a beautiful early fifteenth century work of art ! The obverse is a splendid representation of a medieval king and English sea-power and the reverse a piece of classic medieval art. Henry was a child of only nine months when he came to the throne,thus making him the youngest person ever to succeed to the English throne. Two months later, on 21 October 1422, he became King of France upon his grandfather Charles VI's death in agreement with the Treaty of Troyes in 1420. His mother, Catherine of Valois, was then 20 years old and, as Charles VI's daughter, was viewed with considerable suspicion ! His father's brothers were appointed regents until he came of age and this particular coin was struck under the regency of John Duke of Bedford.

England, James I gold Laurel issued 1623 – 1624.

Stock code: CM001860
£3,750
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James I, 1603 – 1625
Denomination/metal: Gold Laurel
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'lis', 1623-24.
Type Third Coinage, Fourth bust.
Ref. no: S 2638c.

Obv. Laureate, draped bust of James left, denomination 'XX' behind, 'IACOBVS D'G' MAG' BRIT' FRAN' ET HIB' REX'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms on cross fourchee, 'FACIAM EOS IN GENTEM VNAM', (I will make them into one nation).
35mm, 8.94g. GVF - Good Very Fine, well struck.

Exceptional example – usually weakly struck this piece has a well struck portrait with all legend readable - also very nice even light toning and thus rare and desirable. In 1619 there was a currency reform and new 20 shillings piece was reduced in weigh making the former coins worth 22 shillings. To make it easy to differentiate between the two coins this new lighter coin was issued with James facing left - the other direction and wearing a laurel wreath rather than a crown. Consequently it became known as a 'Laurel'

Scotland, Charles I gold Unit (20/-) issued c 1642.

Stock code: CM001859
£8,000
Country: Scotland
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Unit
Type Third Coinage, Briot's.
Ref. no: S 5531.

Obv. Crowned half-length bust right in full armour holding sceptre and orb, CAROLVS DG MAG BRITAN FRAN ET HIB REX. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms dividing crowned CR, HIS PRAESVM VT PROSIM, ( I am set over them that I might be profitable to them).
37mm, 9.89g. GVF - Good Very Fine well struck although rev. a little off centre

Outstanding coin – especially in artistry – which coupled with its good state of preservation makes a rare, desirable and a very handsome piece ! Its maker, Frenchman Nicholas Briot, had fled to England in 1625, pursued by creditors, and offered his services and machinery to Charles I. He was appointed Master of the Scottish Mint in August 1635. He was then later joined by his son-in-law John Falconer who in 1637 shared this position with him. Briot went back to London the following year and Falconer ran the Edinburgh mint on his own. He produced this series of early machine made coins which design was essentially a continuation of Briot's. Briot's work is of the highest calibre and his introduction of the screw press gave this series of coins a technical excellence far in advance of what was being made south of the border and ahead of its time by many decades. They are indeed of fantastic quality and this Unit is considered to be one of Scotland's finest pieces of numismatic art.

West Friesland, Trade and Industry in the United Provinces, Silver Medal by C Wijntges, 1617

Stock code: CM001893
£3,000
Country: Netherlands
Date/mint mark: 1617
Type Silver Medal by C Wijntges
Ref. no: vLoon II, 55

Obv. port view of a ship in full sail, NAVTA ÆQVORA VERRIT TVRBIDA Rev. a milkmaid with cow, other farmyard animals around, AVIDI SPES FIDA COLONI
51mm, EF - Good extremely fine.

Charles II (1660-1685), Silver Presentation Medal c 1683, by J Roettier

Stock code: CM001888
£1,800
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles II (1660 - 1685)
Type Silver Presentation Medal by J Roettier
Ref. no: Eimer 267; MI i 595/277

Obv. draped and armoured bust right, CAROL. II. D. G. ANGL. SCOT. FRAN. ET. HIB. REX Rev. Royal Arms, in exergue on ribbon, DIEU ET MON DROIT
53mm, EF - Occasional minor marks, otherwise extremely fine and attractively toned, rare.

England, Edward VI, Gold Sovereign of Twenty Shillings 1550-1553, Southwark mint.

Stock code: CM001806
£28,000
Country: England
King (reign): Edward VI (1547 - 1553)
Denomination/metal: Gold Sovereign
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Y' -15 December 1550 to 6 July 1553.
Type Third Period, Southwark mint,
Ref. no: Schneider 690; North 1927; S 2450.

Obv. Crowned half-length armoured figure of King right, holding orb with sword on shoulder; linear and beaded circles surrounding, initial mark y at start of legend both sides. outer beaded circle both sides, y :EDVVARD’. VI: D’: G’. AGL’: FRA’. Z: hIB’: REX., Rev. Crowned quartered Royal Arms supported by crowned lion to left, griffin to right, ER on panel below, linear and beaded circles surrounding, legend reads, y .IhS’. AVTE’. TRANCI’. PER: MEDIV’. ILLORV’. IBAT, (But Jesus passing through the midst of them went His way).
35mm, 11.16g. VF - Very Fine, struck with a pleasing portrait, small short scratch over the orb cross and possibly lightly cleaned in antiquity.

Rare coin in good condition, marvellous portrait of this teenage king. It is interesting to read the footnote from this provenance, where it is speculated that mintmark 'Y' for the third period Sovereign is five times rarer than mintmark 'tun' which is more usually seen for this issue. According to Schneider the contemporary accounts of gold output for the end of this period are missing relating to the initial mark tun, so factual corroboration of this ratio cannot be gleaned for sure. This was the last gold Sovereign issued in the reign of King Edward dating to 1551. This Sovereign was issued in “crown gold” at a 20-Shilling face value and 22 carat fineness (0.917 fine gold), which we still use for British gold coinage today. Weighing 174.6 grains (11.314g), this issue represented an improvement on the second period Sovereign and a further sign of the economic recovery of the coinage after the debasement in his father’s reign. The Hemisphere Collection example emanates from the Southwark mint, again with the initial Y as its mintmark for Under-Treasurer, Sir John Yorke.

England, James II gold Guinea 1688.

Stock code: CM001784
£5,450
Country: England
King (reign): James II (1685 - 1688)
Denomination/metal: Gold Guinea
Date/mint mark: 1688
Type Second bust
Ref. no: S 3402.

Obv. Laureate bust left, 'IACOBVS II DEI GRATIA'. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, sceptres in angles, 'MAG BR FRA ET HIB REX'.
25mm, 8.33g. AEF - Almost Extremely Fine, considerable amounts of original mint luste

James I (1603-1625), Synod of Dort [Dordtrecht], 1619, Silver Medal by W v. Bijlaer

Stock code: CM001883
£1,800
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James I (1603 - 1625)
Date/mint mark: 1619
Type Silver Medal by W v. Bijlaer
Ref. no: Eimer 99; MI i 222/77

Obv. interior of the long chamber at Dordtrecht with the assembled council, ASSERTA RELIGIONE, 1619 Rev. pilgrims ascend a rocky mountain, buffeted by the four winds, to reach a temple, ERVNT VT MONS SION and date MDCXIX around
58mm, GEF - Good extremely fine.

Medals of this type were minted between 1619 and 1630. The obverse is derived from an engraving by François Schilleman, commissioned by the States General, from a design by Daniel Heinsius. The design was also used for the painting by Pouwel Weyts now in the Stedelijk Museum in Dordtrecht. The medal comes in several varieties such as with and without a dog in the foreground, with and without signature of IvB ( Jan van Bylaer), differences in the ceiling, the mountain with either three or six pilgrims. There were 4 different obverse dies and 2 reverse dies. Medals with the words CVM PRIV. meaning CUM PRIVELIGIO “with permission (of The States General)” were made for the market after 1619 until 1630. Those without these words were made for the participants themselves. The official number of participants was 102 and an example of the medal was given to each. Initially 26 gold medals, with a chain, were struck for foreign participants. The gold medal had a value of 150 Guilders and the small chain 50 guilders. At least 58 silver were struck for the Dutch representatives. Later (31 December 1619) it was decided that the Dutch participants should also be entitled a gold medal so in total 84 gold ones were struck. Examples with CVM PRIV. are less rare then those without. How many with the words CVM PRIV. were made is not known as this was a private enterprise of the mint master.

Hirohito (1926-1989[Showa]), as Crown Prince, Copper Medal, 1921, commemorating his western tour

Stock code: CM001892
£400
Country: Japan
Date/mint mark: 1921


Obv. ¾-facing bust Rev. warship flanked by two pigeons
60mm, EF - Medal good extremely fine, base of case scuffed, scarce.

Medallion in gold for Victory over Jacobites at Culloden 1746.

Stock code: CM001894
£24,500
Country: Great Britain
King (reign): George II (1723 - 1760)
Date/mint mark: 1746
Type Commemorative by Richard Yeo
Ref. no: MI ii 613/278; Eimer 604.

Obv. Draped and cuirassed bust right of the Duke of Cumberland, 'GULIELMUS GEOR II R FIL DUX CUMBRIAE', William son of King George II, Duke of Cumberland. Rev. The Duke, as Hercules, tramples on Discord (with the face of the Young Pretender) and raises a thankful Britannia to her feet, 'PERDVELLIB EX ANG FVGAT AD CULLOD DEBELLAT 16 APR 1746', The rebels driven from England and defeated at Culloden 16th. April 1746.
51mm, 96.56g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine with considerable amounts of original mint bloom

Late Roman, Arcadius gold solidus, Constantinople 383.

Stock code: CM001898
£1,900
Country: Roman
King (reign): Arcadius, 383 – 408
Denomination/metal: Gold Solidus
Date/mint mark: 383
Type Constantinople mint
Ref. no: S 4119. C 14

Obv. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, DN ARCADIVS P F AVG. Rev. Constantinopolis facing, head right with right foot on prow, holding sceptre in right hand and plaque inscribed VOT V MVL X, around CONCORDIA AVGGG S (Concord of the emperors [3])
22mm, 4.45g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, about as struck with lustre

Superb condition – about as struck with original mint lustre – rare thus ! Arcadius was Emperor from 383 until his death in 408. This coin was struck in the first year of his joint reign with Valentinian II and Theodosius I. He was the eldest son of Theodosius I and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Honorius. His father divided the empire in half giving Arcadius the eastern and Honorius the western part A weak ruler, his reign was dominated by a series of powerful ministers and by his wife, Aelia. In 399 on 13 July, Arcadius issued an edict ordering that all remaining non-Christian temples should be immediately demolished.

England, Elizabeth I gold Angel struck 1582.

Stock code: CM002060
£4,425
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Gold Angel
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'sword' - 1582
Type Fifth issue
Ref. no: N 1991/1; S 2525.

Obv. The angel St. Michael spearing dragon like devil at his feet, ELIZABETH D' G' ANG' FR' ET HI' REGINA. Rev. Ancient ship with Royal Arms on crucifix mast, dividing E and rose, A DNO FACTVM EST ISTVD MIRABE, (This is the Lord's doing and is marvellous in our eyes).
29mm, 5.24g. AVF - About Very Fine,

Although this piece has seen a little wear it is strongly struck which results in all the main details being clear. This coin was struck in 1582 the year in which the Gregorian calender was implemented in Continental Europe. In the winter of that year most countries knocked off nearly two weeks overnight to correct the drift of seasons which alarmed the people greatly. This also put England very much out of sync with the Continent, which lasted until 1752 !

Saxon England – Mercia, Beornwulf silver penny, 823 – 825.

Stock code: CM002064
£11,250
Country: England, Anglo-Saxon
Denomination/metal: Silver Penny
Date/mint mark: 824 -825
Type Group II
Ref. no: N 397; S 929.

Obv. Crude bust right in circle, +BEORHPVLF RE. Rev. Cross crosslet in circle , +EADHOA MOHET
20mm, 1.29g. GEF - Extremely Fine, with attractive metallic grey toning. Slight edge flaw to flan at 7 o' clock

Excessively rare coin – there are probably only 50 – 60 coins known of Beornwulf in all – and most of these art in institutions. This piece, thought to have been minted in either London or East Anglia, is in exceptionally nice condition – more or less uncirculated with a beautiful metallic grey patina. The edge flaw is in the flan and therefore in the original production and not later damage. Beornwulf was King of the Saxon kingdom of Mercia (now the Midlands of England) from 823 to 826. His short reign saw the collapse of Mercia's supremacy over the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy. In 825 his army marched against the West Saxons and met them at Ellandun now present day Wroughton near Swindon in Wiltshire, the battle ended in a disastrous and complete defeat for the Mercian's and is seen by historians as the end of the so-called Mercian Supremacy. Subsequently in 826 the West Saxons under Ecgbert's son Æthelwulf invaded Kent and drove out its pro-Mercian king, Baldred. In the wake of these events, Mercia's dominance of southern England rapidly unravelled. Essex and Sussex switched their loyalty to Egbert and then, in consequence, the East Anglians asked for Egbert's protection against the Mercians in the same year. Beornwulf was killed by the East Anglians in battle while attempting to put down this rebellion.

Gt. Britain, William III silver Crown 1700.

Stock code: CM002061
£2,250
Country: Great Britain
King (reign): William III (1694 – 1702)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: Dvodecimo 1700.
Type Third bust

Obv. Laureate, draped bust right, GVLIELMVS III DEI GRATIA. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, lion of Nassau in centre, MAG BR FRA ET HIB REX.
40mm, 29.5g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, much original lustre with blue iridescence correction marks on bust, encapsulated in plastic by NGC and graded 'MS 62'

A small hoard of these William III crowns was found in the last century all of which were in mint condition with lustre. Before the flan was struck the weight was corrected by filing off silver – these file marks can be seen on the top of the hair, not quite 'struck out'. This is a normal phenomenon of silver of this period. This example comes from that hoard and otherwise there is really no other source for such pristine coins !

Celtic Britain DOBUNNI, Eisu gold Stater, 'Tree type, c. AD 20 – 40.

Stock code: CM002062
£1,875
Country: England, Celtic
Denomination/metal: Gold Stater
Date/mint mark: c. AD 20 – 40
Type Dobunnic 'F'.
Ref. no: v A 1105-1; S 381.

Obv. Dobunnic tree emblem with pellet at base Rev. Horse proceeding right, wheel below and dispersed symbols over all, 'EISV' above.
17mm, 5.7g. EF - Extremely Fine, well and centrally struck

Well struck piece with all legend and horse visible – and in very good condition ! The Dobunni Celts lived in the part of south western Britain that today broadly coincides with the counties of North Somerset, Bristol, and Gloucestershire - their territory contained two large towns (Corinium Dobunnorum now Cirencester, and Colonia Nerviana Glevum now Gloucester). Besides this there were numerous smaller towns, and many rich villas.. They were not a warlike people but farmers and were probably vassals of the tribe to their east, the Catevellauni. They submitted to the Romans even before they reached their lands and afterwards readily adopted the Romano-British lifestyle. Little is known of the Eisu named on this coin, except that from find evidence which gives us a rough date of issue ie AD 20 – 40. It is not even known if he ruled in succession or at the same time as the other kings/chieftains named on Dobunnic coins. The strange fern-like object on the coin is the badge or emblem of the tribe and occurs on most Dobunnic staters.

The Earliest Anglo-Gallic Gold Coin, the Ecu D’or of Edward III

Stock code: CM001819
£14,500
Country: Anglo Gallic
King (reign): Edward III (1327 - 1377)
Denomination/metal: Gold Ecu d'or
Date/mint mark: 1348
Type gold Ecu D’or, issued from 1348 at Bordeaux

Obv. seated robed King on large throne facing holding sword, shield to right, tressure of nine arcs surrounding, trefoils on cusps and in spandrels, beaded inner and outer circles, colon pellet stops and saltires, +EDVVARDVS: DEIx xGRAx xAGL: FRANCIE: REX Rev. die axis at 3 o’clock, voided quatrefoil at centre and at terminals of ornamental cross, all within quatrefoil shape double tressure of beaded and linear outline, voided trefoils in spandrels, beaded circle surrounding, trefoil and contraction mark in first word, colon pellet stops, +XP’*C: VINCIT:XP’C: REGHAT: XP’C: IMPERAT, note H for last N in legend
4.47g. - Lightly toned, a little uneven in shape, otherwise good very fine and rare.

Charles I, silver Pound of Twenty Shillings, Oxford Mint, 1643, 3 struck over 2

Stock code: CM001841
£25,000
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shillings, Twenty (Pound)
Date/mint mark: 1643
Type Oxford Mint, 1643, 3 struck over 2
Ref. no: Brooker 863A; N.2398; S.2940

Obv. King on horseback left over arms and militaria, including cannon, Oxford plume behind, beaded inner and outer circle and legend surrounding, initial mark Oxford plume Rev. die axis at 3 o’clock, Declaration, three Oxford plumes above, date below, seven pellets before legend
120.53g. - Toned, usual hammered edge, a few rim nicks and a bruise on reverse rim, a little porosity on obverse, small striation in exergue, reveres with a couple of tiny digs otherwise one of the better examples known of this variety of silver Pound the largest British currency coin ever struck.

Gt. Britain, James II silver Crown 1688.

Stock code: CM002057
£5,100
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James II (1685 - 1688)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: Qvarto 1688
Type Second bust
Ref. no: S 3407.

Obv. Laureate and draped head left, IACOBVS II DEI GRATIA. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, garter star in centre, sceptres in angles, MAG BR ET FRA ET HIB REX.
39mm, 29.66g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, attractive dark toning with underlying lustre.

Outstanding piece, more or less 'uncirculated', well struck (James crowns often weak on hair) with beautiful even grey toning with underlying mint brilliance.

Gt. Britain, Anne silver Crown (Pre Union) 1707.

Stock code: CM002058
£4,600
Country: Great Britain
King (reign): Anne (1702 - 1714)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: Sexto 1707
Type Pre Union, Roses & Plumes rev.
Ref. no: S 3578.

Obv. Draped bust left with hair up, ANNA DEI GRATIA. Rev. Crowned Royal Arms in cruciform, garter star in centre, roses and plumes in angles, MAG BR FRA ET HIB REG.
40mm, 29.9g. GEF - Good Extremely Fine, attractive dark toning with underlying lustre.

Outstanding piece, more or less 'uncirculated', well struck with beautiful even grey toning with underlying mint brilliance.

Japan, Hirohito gold 20-Yen 'Showa 7' (1932),

Stock code: CM001847
£32,750
Country: Japan
King (reign): Hirohito, 1926-1989
Denomination/metal: Gold Yen, Twenty
Date/mint mark: Showa 7 (1932)
Type Ministry of Finance
Ref. no: JNDA 01-6; KM Y52.

Obv. Sunburst within mirror over denomination. Rev. Denomination under Chrysanthemum within Paulownia and Chrysanthemum wreath.
29mm, 1.666g. UC - Uncirculated some minor bag marks. In official 'Ministry of Finance, Japan' holder.

Hirohito only issued this denomination for the two years 1930 and 1931 and then in 1932 the coin was discontinued and only a very small number were issued this third year. This last date 20 Yen originates from the Japanese Finance Minister hoard, and were previously unavailable to the market. Those sales have now been halted and collectors are left to compete for the coins which have found their way into the international market. This discontinued date probably never left government vaults, as collectible specimens are today excessively rare.

Pleasing Third Period Gold Sovereign of King Edward VI

Stock code: CM001902
£19,500
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Edward VI (1547 - 1553)
Denomination/metal: Gold Sovereign
Type third period (1550-53)
Ref. no: Schneider 692; N.1927; S.2450

Obv. crowned half-length armoured figure of King right, holding orb with sword on shoulder, linear and beaded circles surrounding, initial mark tun both sides, Lombardic lettering with lozenge pellet stops, :EDWARD’. VI: D’: G’. AGL’: FRA’. Z: hIBER’: REX: outer beaded circle both sides Rev. die axis at 7 o’clock, crown over quartered shield of arms supported by crowned lion to left, griffin to right, ER on large banner below, beaded circle surrounding, linear and beaded circles surrounding, .IHS’. AVTEm. TRAnSIE’. PER MEDI’. ILLORV’. IBAT.
1.036g. VF - Just a little weak in parts and well struck for issue, lightly toned, a pleasing very fine.

The Largest Hammered Gold Coin of King James I Dating to Gunpowder Plot Time

Stock code: CM001901
£21,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): James I, 1603 – 1625
Denomination/metal: Gold Ryal of 30 Shillings
Type second coinage (1604-19)
Ref. no: Schneider II-6; N.2079; S.2613

Obv. King seated facing on throne with orb and sceptre, pillar either side, portcullis below, tressure and beaded circle surrounding, initial mark rose (1605-06) both sides, pellet and comma stops in legend both sides, IACOBVS. D; G; MAG; BRIT; FRAN; ET. HIBER; REX., outer beaded circle surrounding both sides Rev. die axis at 4 o’clock, quartered arms upon ornate rose, beaded circle surrounding, .A.DNO; FACTVM. EST.ISTVD. ET.EST. MIRAB; IN.OCVLIS.NRIS
1.363g. GVF - A little weakly struck at face as usual for this mint mark, otherwise toned, struck on a broad flan, a bold very fine / good very fine, not dissimilar to the quality of the Schneider example illustrated on the front cover of the sylloge.

Charles II, silver Dollar, 1676

Stock code: CM001911
£3,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles II (1660 - 1685)
Denomination/metal: Silver Dollar
Date/mint mark: 1676

Ref. no: AH Baldwin + Son Ltd purchased 1980. Harrington E Manville, Scottish Collection, Dix Noonan and Webb 15th September 2015 lot 94

Obv. laureate and draped bust left, F below drapery, legend surrounding Rev. inverted die axis, crowned cruciform emblematic shields, thistles in angles, pair of interlinked C’s at centre, legend and date surrounding
- Toned, very fine / good very fine and very rare indeed.

Macedonia, Siris (c. 500-480 B.C.), Silver Stater.

Stock code: CM001924
£4,750
Country: Macedonia
Denomination/metal: Silver Stater

Ref. no: SNG ANS 954

Obv. Satyr right, grabbing nymph by her arm as she attempts to flee while looking back, pellet in field Rev. incuse square diagonally divided
9.76g. GVF - An attractive example of excellent archaic style, well-centred, good very fine.

Commonwealth (1649-60), Unite, 1653

Stock code: CM001913
£12,500
Country: England, Commonwealth
King (reign): Oliver Cromwell (Lord Protector) (1653 - 1658)
Denomination/metal: Gold Unite
Date/mint mark: 1653

Ref. no: Schneider 341; N.2715; S.3208

Obv. English shield within laurel and palm branches, initial mark sun, legends in English Rev. shields of England and Ireland, with value above, all within beaded circle, date and legend surrounding
8.98g. - Some light surface marks, lightly toned, about extremely fine

Charles I, Obsidional coinage, Pontefract besieged, silver Shilling, 1648

Stock code: CM001910
£5,500
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: 1648
Type Pontefract besieged
Ref. no: Brooker 1230; N.2646; S.3148

Obv. on lozenge shaped flan, C.R at centre, crown above, legend DVM: SPIRO. SPERO, outer beaded circle both sides Rev. struck en medaille, castle gateway with small flag at top P and C either side of flag, date below, OBS to left, sword in hand to right
6.25g.

Elizabeth I (1558-1603), silver Crown, seventh issue (1601-02)

Stock code: CM001907
£14,500
Country: England, Tudor
King (reign): Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603)
Denomination/metal: Silver Crown
Date/mint mark: 1601-02
Type seventh issue
Ref. no: Cooper dies C/4; N.2012; S.2582

Obv. crowned ornate bust left with orb and sceptre, four fingers on sceptre handle, initial mark 1 (1601) both sides, beaded inner and outer circles and legend surrounding both sides Rev. inverted die axis, quartered shield over long cross fourchée
2.954g. - Attractively toned, nick on cheek, some other small flan flecks in fields both sides, a little double struck, otherwise fully round and significantly less striated than most examples of the Elizabethan Crown, good very fine and rare this nice

Oliver Cromwell (d.1658), gold Broad of Twenty Shillings, engraved by Thomas Simon, 1656

Stock code: CM001905
£40,000
Country: England, Commonwealth
King (reign): Oliver Cromwell (Lord Protector) (1653 - 1658)
Denomination/metal: Gold Shillings, Twenty
Date/mint mark: 1656

Ref. no: Lessen A2; W.R. 39 R2; N.2744; S.3225

Obv. laureate head left, legend surrounding Rev. inverted die axis, crowned quartered shield of arms of the Protectorate, date above, legend surrounding, toothed border both sides, edge, milled
- Hairlined in fields both sides, with a few very light short hairline scratches, three tiny digs in field over the head, otherwise with some red tone and a proof-like brilliance, extremely fine.

According to an article “Warrants and Sketches of Thomas Simon” by D F Allen in the British Numismatic Journal Volume 23, 1940, The Warrant ordering Oliver Cromwell portrait coinage was dated 27th November 1656, and signed by Clerk of Council W Jessop. The order on vellum has Thomas Simon’s name entered over an erasure of that of Blondeau, as the coins were actually struck on Blondeau’s machinery, but all engraving was by Thomas Simon.
In this warrant two coins are specifically ordered, the gold broad and the silver Crown. The order has drawings of the Crown interestingly with an armoured bust of Cromwell with laurel wreath inspired by the Dunbar medal; and the gold broad of 20 Shillings. Beaded circles are also drawn on the warrant to represent an intention for other denominations from silver Halfcrown, Shilling, Sixpence to a gold Half Broad and gold Crown. Dies were made as a direct result of this warrant for the gold broad of 20 Shillings as we have offered herewith.

Sicily, Gela (c. 490-475 B.C.), Silver Didrachm.

Stock code: CM001916
£8,750
Country: Italy, Sicily

Ref. no: Jenkins 71 (O22/R23

Obv. Horseman riding right, brandishing a javelin Rev. CELAS, forepart of a man-headed bull right; within a circular incuse
8.76g. AEF - Toned, of attractive style, about extremely fine.

Antoninus Pius (A.D. 138-161), Gold Aureus. Mint of Rome, struck A.D. 143.

Stock code: CM001922
£9,500
Country: Roman
King (reign): Antonius Pius (138 - 161)
Denomination/metal: Gold Aureus
Date/mint mark: Mint of Rome, struck A.D. 143.

Ref. no: RIC 109a; Calicó 1548

Obv. ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head facing right Rev. IMPERATOR II, Victory advancing right, holding a trophy
7.11g. GEF - Light toning over residual lustre, about extremely fine.

India, Bombay Presidency (1825-31), Gold 1/3-Mohur or Panchia, in the name of Shah 'Alam

Stock code: CM001934
£900
Country: India, British
Denomination/metal: Gold Mohur
Date/mint mark: 1825-31

Ref. no: KM.247; Pr.267
3.88g. GEF

Julian II (A.D. 360-363), Gold Solidus. Mint of Antioch, struck A.D. 361-3.

Stock code: CM001921
£12,500
Country: Roman
King (reign): Julian II, A.D. 360-363
Denomination/metal: Gold Solidus
Date/mint mark: Mint of Antioch, struck A.D. 361-3.

Ref. no: RIC 199; C 79

Obv. FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust facing right Rev. VIRTVS EXERCITVS ROMANORVM, soldier, helmeted, standing right, holding a trophy over shoulder and placing his hand on the head of a kneeling captive, ANTT in exergue
4.44g. GEF - Broad flan, excellent portrait, good extremely fine, a very good example.

Umayyad/Arab Byzantine, Anonymous Gold Semissis, North Africa

Stock code: CM001926
£3,000
Country: Umayyad

Ref. no: Album 116; Bernardi 10; Walker 144

Obv. double facing bust, Latin legend Rev. cippus with globe, on three steps, Latin legend
2g. EF

England, Charles I gold Unite minted in 1625

Stock code: CM001863
£2,600
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Gold Unite
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Lis', 1625.
Type Tower Mint, Group 'A', First bust.
Ref. no: S 2685.

Obv. Crowned, draped bust left with ruff, denomination 'XX' to right, CAROLVS D' G' MAG' BR' FR' ET HI' REX'. Rev. Crowned, garnished Royal Arms, 'FLORENT CONCORDIA REGNA', (Through concord kingdoms flourish).
20mm, 8.98g. VF - Very Fine, good strike

Although this coin has seen some wear it provides a very clear and handsome portrait of Charles I. It is particularly interesting to note that he is wearing a ruff and not a lace collar as we normally think of him, as a 'cavalier'. At the beginning of his reign the fashion was still hanging on to vestiges of the Elizabethan era which would soon disappear. The portrait that appears on this – a coin of the first year of his reign, does in fact present him in his coronation robes.

Anglo Saxon, Edward the Confessor, silver penny of Hastings, 1053 – 1056.

Stock code: CM001862
£900
Country: England, Anglo-Saxon
King (reign): Edward the Confessor (1042 - 1066)
Denomination/metal: Silver Penny
Date/mint mark: 1053 – 1056.
Type Pointed helmet type.
Ref. no: SCBI#42-1268, 1269; N 825; S 1179.

Obv. Helmeted, draped, bearded bust right holding cruciform sceptre in right hand, EWDPERD REX. Rev. Short cross voided, each limb terminating in three crescents, in centre an annulet, BRID:O:N HESTIEN (Brid at Hastings)
36mm, 1.21g. EF - Extremely Fine, strong strike with attractive grey toning

Outstanding example 'condition-wise' very well struck and sharp portrait with beautiful grey toning resulting a superb portrait of this Saxon king. In 1042 Edward 'the Confessor' became King, he was the surviving son of Ethelred and his second wife, Emma and was a half-brother of Hardicanute. With few rivals (Canute's line was extinct and Edward's only male relatives were two nephews in exile), Edward was undisputed king; the threat of usurpation by the King of Norway rallied the English and Danes in allegiance to Edward. Warding off political threats, England during the last 15 years of Edward's reign was relatively peaceful. Prosperity was rising as agricultural techniques improved and the population rose to around one million. Taxation was comparatively light, as Edward was not an extravagant king and lived off the revenues of his own lands (approximately £5,500 a year) - nor did he have to pay for expensive military campaigns. Deeply religious, Edward was responsible for building Westminster Abbey (in the Norman style) and he was buried there after his death in 1066.

England, Charles I silver milled shilling, York 1643 – 1644.

Stock code: CM001864
£900
Country: England, Stuart
King (reign): Charles I (1625 - 1649)
Denomination/metal: Silver Shilling
Date/mint mark: Mintmark 'Lion', 1643-44.
Type York Mint, Class 4.
Ref. no: S 2873.

Obv. Crowned, draped bust left, denom. 'XII' behind, CAROLV DG MAG BRIT FRAN ET HIB REX'. Rev. Crowned and heavily garnished oval Royal Arms, 'EBOR' (York) below, 'CHRISTO AVSPICE REGNO', (I reign under the auspices of Christ).
35mm, 5.62g. GVF - Good Very Fine,small scratch in field in front of face, attractive grey toning.

Although exhibiting a little wear this coin has a very attractive grey patina and is a desirable piece. York was Charles' second capital (Oxford) after he was forced to leave London in early 1642 and he arrived there in March . Briot followed in May and set up a mint there using his new coin mill. Thus, unlike the crude quickly hammered coins that were issued in the west of England, the North produced these high quality machine made pieces – but of course in much smaller numbers as production was so much slower. The 'York coinage', in appearance, was the finest of the Royalist issues during the Civil War – and this is a very good example.

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